User login

The Social-Media Revolution

(August 2013) posted on Tue Oct 01, 2013

Use Facebook and other platforms to target customers at a granular level.


By Mark Coudray

click an image below to view slideshow

Social signals are about what you pick up from conversations in your news stream. They may be local, regional, or national events. They may be items related to your market niche. They could be just about anything the social sphere is talking about. You want to enter that conversation and contribute to it.

As an example, there may be significant buzz surrounding a local event for which you’re doing the T-shirts or signage. You can actually help to promote the event by posting useful and interesting photos, videos, or commentary about what you’re doing to support the event. You might make a free offer to your fan base that helps promote the event. You want to add value to the event and build goodwill and awareness for your business at the same time.

Design your posts to be shared
This is where the viral element shows itself. Viral means simply that the post is passed along to a greater number of people than the number originally seeded. As an example, you have 500 fans. You post something and 10 of them share with their friends or fans. The average friend/fan base is 266. The secondary exposure to your initial 500 views is now 10 x 266 = 2660. If the post is really good, it will get shared again and again.

This is an oversimplification, but the method is completely viable. A good friend of mine started a new fan page with zero Likes in May. He wrote a book that will not be published and available until August. He has been using this method for the last six weeks and, as of July 1, he has more than 17,000 Likes—and they are growing at more than 900 a day. I’ve been watching it daily. The growth is amazing. That leads us to social proof.

Social proof is where the market validates you. In late 2012, Nielsen, one of the nation’s largest media companies, released a market survey showing consumer/advertiser trust. Some interesting surprises were in store:

Consumer Trusts Advertiser Claims: 13%
Consumer Trusts Independent Reviews: 70%
Consumer Trusts Peer (Personal Friend) Reviews: 92%


Terms:

Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to the magazine.