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heat curing

Posted on Thu, 29 Sep 2005 at 2:54



i have been silk screening for a few months now but just with the basic air dry ink and a couple screens, i am looking to widen my opportunities and have decided to try to start using the Union Maxopake Plastisol Ink but it says that the ink has to be dried and cured up to 300 degrees. what do i need to do this with and where can i get the right equipment? thank you for any help.

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Comments

Anonymous says: you should use an infrared curing oven which you can get at www.printa.com posted on: Thu, 09/29/2005 - 6:06pm
Anonymous says: Ross, Join www.screenprinters.net It is the largest screen print board on the net. You will need a conveyor drier or a flash cure unit. Which one depends on the qty. of shirts you do. Email me privately ...

Ross,
Join www.screenprinters.net It is the largest screen print board on the net. You will need a conveyor drier or a flash cure unit. Which one depends on the qty. of shirts you do. Email me privately if you have any other questions.
God Bless You
Don

posted on: Sat, 10/08/2005 - 3:42pm
Anonymous says: You can use an industrial hot air gun. You can find them at grainger or mc master carr. When you decide to run some numbers you should get a conveyor drier. posted on: Fri, 12/16/2005 - 9:56pm
Anonymous says: I have a question kind of related to this. We have a conveyor dryer (so old I think that it came over on the Mayflower when screen printing came to America) but we have replaced all elements, fans, controls, ...

I have a question kind of related to this. We have a conveyor dryer (so old I think that it came over on the Mayflower when screen printing came to America) but we have replaced all elements, fans, controls, and we are still having problems getting things at a constant tempature. We are not printing things at a point we are getting wash out, but we run a temp strip and one minute is melting the strip it is so hot and the next minute is white.
We have our dryer set up on the following parameters. It should be burning about 320 degrees F at a period of 45 seconds for t-shirts and at one minute for our nylon product sportswear. We are having problems finding a happy medium. You know one where we are curing ink without melting Nylon. Another problem related, is that we have three presses that share this dryer and since we have revamped the process, if one printer is printing the heat of the dryer can heat to the point the other printers can not print, NOT VERY PRODUCTIVE. Can anyone suggest anything?

posted on: Wed, 01/18/2006 - 11:42pm
Anonymous says: Coy, First, I would call the Tech. dept for your drier, then if they couldn't help, I would get an electrician to check out the drier and voltage going to it and as a last resort, replace it if the voltage ...

Coy,
First, I would call the Tech. dept for your drier, then if they couldn't help, I would get an electrician to check out the drier and voltage going to it and as a last resort, replace it if the voltage is correct. Do you have anything else running on the same circuit that may be dropping the voltage to the drier? This could cause the different heat temps too. JMO.
God Bless You
Don

posted on: Thu, 01/19/2006 - 10:50am
Anonymous says: I am just starting in the imprinted apparel industry myself. So i am no expert. For starters I bought a heat gun from a department store, you can find one at a hardware store, BUT if you are not careful ...

I am just starting in the imprinted apparel industry myself. So i am no expert.

For starters I bought a heat gun from a department store, you can find one at a hardware store, BUT if you are not careful you can undercure the plastisol or burn the shirt.

I have a t-shirt heat transfer press I am considering building a stand for to possibly adjust the angle so that the platen of the heat press is at a parallel plane to the platen on the press.

Plastisols cure at temps from 280-310 degrees from what i had read.

Get a flash cure unit if you plan to do a lot of plastisol printing. You can pick them up for about $500 low end model, to the cadilac model around $2,000

You can also cure with extended exposure to heat lamps, i worked for a company that had a series of heat lamps in the top of a conveyer system.

there are gas and electric conveyer dryers also, but i dont have the capital to go that direction yet.

I hope that helps you.

If you are new to the industry and want to chat more to share tips etc. in real time chat... email me

Andrew Huer
Spectrum 4 Enterprises

prints_hues@yahoo.com

posted on: Sat, 04/01/2006 - 2:56pm

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