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Help with jagged edges on stencils

Posted on Sat, 10 Dec 2005 at 22:38



I need help! My exposed stencils all seem to have jagged edges, especially on curves, but also on straight edges although less pronounced. I have checked my positives and they are perfect ( I use an Epson 4000 inkjet with FastRip.) I also checked my exposure time with a calculator and it is ok. Any help will be greatly appreciated.

Edward

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Comments

Anonymous says: What color mesh are you using? White mesh tends to do this. Use a colored mesh. Your mesh count also might be the problem. If it is to low you can also get jagged edges. posted on: Sun, 12/11/2005 - 1:31pm
Anonymous says: Doug is on the right track. It more than likely is a LOW mesh and not enough stencil thichness for that mesh. If you only ahve low mesh, try coatingt h mesh several more times. Letting it dry between ...

Doug is on the right track. It more than likely is a LOW mesh and not enough stencil thichness for that mesh. If you only ahve low mesh, try coatingt h mesh several more times. Letting it dry between coats. This builds a better bridge between the emulsion and the threads as well as creating a bewtter edge and smooth surface, free from hills and vally's. You can also improve it by using a higher mesh ocunt. Low is around 110, give or take a mesh size. Med=ium is 150-200 and High is 300.

No Matter the mesh, you will still need several coats (drying btween coats) on all mesh to create your good gasket or seal between the screens "garment side" and the garment. THis helps reduce the jaggies.

posted on: Mon, 01/09/2006 - 6:14pm
Anonymous says: Doug is on the right track. It more than likely is a LOW mesh and not enough stencil thichness for that mesh. If you only ahve low mesh, try coatingt h mesh several more times. Letting it dry between ...

Doug is on the right track. It more than likely is a LOW mesh and not enough stencil thichness for that mesh. If you only ahve low mesh, try coatingt h mesh several more times. Letting it dry between coats. This builds a better bridge between the emulsion and the threads as well as creating a bewtter edge and smooth surface, free from hills and vally's. You can also improve it by using a higher mesh ocunt. Low is around 110, give or take a mesh size. Med=ium is 150-200 and High is 300.

No Matter the mesh, you will still need several coats (drying btween coats) on all mesh to create your good gasket or seal between the screens "garment side" and the garment. THis helps reduce the jaggies.

posted on: Mon, 01/09/2006 - 6:14pm
Anonymous says: thats helpful to me too....I'm just wondering how 'safe' it is to apply another coat to my screen. What I mean is do I have to recoat the screen in an entirely 'light safe' room? or if I'm fairly quick ...

thats helpful to me too....I'm just wondering how 'safe' it is to apply another coat to my screen. What I mean is do I have to recoat the screen in an entirely 'light safe' room? or if I'm fairly quick does it not matter? I'm using a pretty standard Diazo phot emulsion (The kind you get from hobby stores as opposed to some sort of industrial screenprinters..if theres much of a difference). Thanks

posted on: Sun, 02/05/2006 - 6:56am

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