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Printing on dark shirts....need help, please.

Posted on Sun, 4 Feb 2007 at 22:10



I am new to the screen printing world. I have no problem doing shirts that are light colored. My problem is...when I do dark shirts there is not enough ink going through the screen. Part of the pattern does fine and then the other half seems like the ink isn't going through the screen well. Is there something wrong with my screens (operator error) or what? I am at a loss. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

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Comments

rockyp says: on dark garments, using light ink you need to flash and print a second coat of ink. posted on: Tue, 02/06/2007 - 1:25pm
Tim W says: it sounds like you have to much pressure on one side of your sgueege look at the bend in your rubber when you print and try to even out your pressure. posted on: Thu, 03/08/2007 - 6:15pm
Anonymous says: first, i'm assuming that you're printing an underbase and flashing that. remember, putting more pressure doesn't make the print more opaque...utilizing squegee angle and off contact can help you out. printing ...

first, i'm assuming that you're printing an underbase and flashing that.

remember, putting more pressure doesn't make the print more opaque...utilizing squegee angle and off contact can help you out.

printing darks shouldn't be much harder than on lights if you're using good screen printing fundementals

if you're inks are still coming out too light, make sure you're not basing down your inks too much..you are using an underbase, correct? 8)

posted on: Fri, 03/30/2007 - 2:56am
jr_sanford says: Hi Shelley, As the others have suggested, a white (flash) underplate may be needed. I also suggest that the white plate be "choked" a bit to make it easier to register the art. Choked means to make ...

Hi Shelley,

As the others have suggested, a white (flash) underplate may be needed. I also suggest that the white plate be "choked" a bit to make it easier to register the art. Choked means to make it a bit smaller all around.

Some inks will work without a flash plate, like Athletic Gold. Just print, flash, print (and flash - print again if needed.)

J.R. Sanford
Production Manager
NW Awards
185 NW Chehalis AV
Chehalis, WA 98532
(shop) 360-748-7346
(cell) 360-880-6384

posted on: Fri, 03/14/2008 - 8:39am
Orion says: Sounds like the off contact is lower on one side of your screen. The screen must be parallel on both the x and y axises. posted on: Wed, 03/26/2008 - 4:09pm
jr_sanford says: along with using a sharp edged squeegee. Make sure your platten is smooth and free of debris. :shock: J.R. Sanford Production Manager NW Awards 185 NW Chehalis AV Chehalis, WA 98532 (shop) 360-748-7346 (cell) ...

along with using a sharp edged squeegee.
Make sure your platten is smooth and free of debris. :shock:

J.R. Sanford
Production Manager
NW Awards
185 NW Chehalis AV
Chehalis, WA 98532
(shop) 360-748-7346
(cell) 360-880-6384

posted on: Wed, 03/26/2008 - 5:10pm
Bill Hood says: shelley200331 wrote:I am new to the screen printing world. I have no problem doing shirts that are light colored. My problem is...when I do dark shirts there is not enough ink going through the screen. ...

shelley200331 wrote:
I am new to the screen printing world. I have no problem doing shirts that are light colored. My problem is...when I do dark shirts there is not enough ink going through the screen. Part of the pattern does fine and then the other half seems like the ink isn't going through the screen well. Is there something wrong with my screens (operator error) or what? I am at a loss. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!

Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to print an underbase to achieve a brilliant white on a black garment. You only need to assure that you pre-engineer the screen and squeegee correctly. See the following YouTube Video for a demonstration of printing white on black with one stroke and no flash, and without printing an underbase.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CtLvG0X3_JU

You will need an open mesh. While I print with 156-64 at 45N/cm2, you will probably find good results using a 110-80 at 32N/cm2.

You will need to coat this screen with a good, high-solids emulsion, with a sufficient number of passes to produce an emulsion over mesh ratio of about 12-percent. Remember that your last stroke should be on the squeegee side to move the emulsion to the bottom or substrate side of the screen. Dry this screen with the substrate side down.

You will need a 70-durometer squeegee with a sharp edge. Follow the criteria presented in the video for printing technique.

Printing white on black is not really all that difficult when you learn how to do it. The problem with screenprinting is that there are great number of people who think that they have found success in the way in which they do things (such as print/flash/print/flash/print to achieve white on black) and simply stop looking for a better, more efficient and cost savings way of doing something.

I was recently in North Dakota and stopped by a shop during my lunch break to see if they wanted to learn how to achieve more production with less work. When I mentioned one-stroke printing, the owner of the shop stated that it was impossible as he had tried it and it didn't work. When I explained that I had been doing it successfully for over 30 years and had taught thousands how to do so. He became angry and said it can't be done and that I was "a damn liar." Well, he didn't use such nice words, but those can't be posted here in this formula.

The point is that people do not want to admit that they have been wrong. Everybody wants to be good at what they do and not be to told that there is a better way. You watch this thread and there will be someone who will make the same assertions here.

Bill Hood
BillHoodConsulting.com

posted on: Mon, 10/27/2008 - 3:52pm

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