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some advice please

Posted on Wed, 29 Sep 2004 at 13:14



Im a total beginner in screen printing and after searching the web for articles and advice i , confused about conflicting info..

1. what is the best mesh count for..a) standard spot colour work, bold solid letterinf and block colours...b) half tone work, gradual blending work ...and c)4 colour process work. - also as i am in the UK do you know mesh conversion to euro or uk measurements e.g what is a 150 USA mesh count in europe.

2. for over printing, how do you know when you are flashing and not curing? as i was told to make sure the shirts are not heated too much to overprint.

3. is speedball emultion good for profssional work?

4. is it dangerous to inhale plastisol ink?

sorry if the questions are a little stupid but any advice is most appr.

Thanx.

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Anonymous says: Every mesh count has it's uses. From one job to the next you may change the mesh to gain a different result. Printing basic black ink on a white shirt with no detail I would use a 160 mesh. Four colour ...

Every mesh count has it's uses. From one job to the next you may change the mesh to gain a different result. Printing basic black ink on a white shirt with no detail I would use a 160 mesh. Four colour process is determined by taking your LPI and multiplying by 4 or 5 that will give the best mesh count for holding the detail without getting mouray (sp?) White ink will print with lower mesh counts like 130 or 110 on sweat shirts. The mesh count here in the USA is in threads per inch, the conversion to metric, well actually I could not tell ya, folks here seem to like the inch system. Personaly I think metric is easier to understand. I just dont know how the concersion goes. Speedball emulsion is by no means a quality or evan close to a professional product. You should be able to get SAATI emulsion in your country. Try the web to find a dealer in your area, Saati has a dealer locator on thier site. As long as you use proper ventilation, plastisol ink is pretty harmless. Basicaly its just liquid plastic. Most of the fumes or smoke you see coming off the shirt is actually the shirt itself. The dyes or bleaching agents in the shirts release the smoke more than the ink does. For checking proper cure temps, you should be using a device called a non-contact infrared tempeture gun. Raytech sells them, the model is called an MT-4 goes for around $100 us dollars. Point hte gun, pull the trigger look at the display and it says the temp. Hope this helps some. E-mail me direct if you need some more help. calibrated@columbus.rr.com

posted on: Tue, 10/05/2004 - 11:52pm

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