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Posted on Sat, 19 Feb 2005 at 11:00



Hi. I've played around with photo-screen printing, but now want to do some more serious work on fabric. I'm looking for any info. on devices to hold down large pieces of fabric while I use several small screens to print. It may sound kooky, but I'm doing artistic prints on textiles and have a unique situation. Maybe some old-fashioned, antique type of home-made equipment would suit my needs. Any help I could find (books, mags, web-sites, shows) would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much for your time.

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Anonymous says: We used to print bolts of cloth. The continuous table (about 5'x 40') had a thin foam pad covered with a thick piece of cloth and firmly attached to the table. The fabric we wanted to print was stretched ...

We used to print bolts of cloth. The continuous table (about 5'x 40') had a thin foam pad covered with a thick piece of cloth and firmly attached to the table.

The fabric we wanted to print was stretched over the top and pinned to the table.

Screens were then moved into position and printed. The pattern was repeated by moving the screen along, lining up with pre-register marks on the edge of the fabric. As the prints were 4 ft. or wider, 2 printers worked either end of the squeegee from each side of the table.

All this can be easily built. More sophisticated systems have lock blocks or pins that the screen rests against to allow for the exact repetition in register of multicolours.

Good luck with it. if you need more general information about screenprinting, visit my website at:

www.squeegeeville.com and go to 'training' there is a free tutorial.

Regards,

Andy MacDougall

-don't forget to check out my latest story on the Rebirth of Rock Posters in January's Screenprinting Magazine, also provided on the front page of Screenweb.

posted on: Sat, 02/19/2005 - 12:29pm
Anonymous says: h ...

how large are you talking?
and are you talking about a pallett
to hold it under screens set up so you
can print all of them with one stroke of the squeegies like a single print head for all screens?

thanks
gary

posted on: Sat, 02/19/2005 - 4:55pm
Anonymous says: Andy's got the ticket. We used to print oversized beach towels and were limited on the colors we would print by our customers imagination. We had 110 foot tables built with the requisite foam material ...

Andy's got the ticket. We used to print oversized beach towels and were limited on the colors we would print by our customers imagination. We had 110 foot tables built with the requisite foam material and covered with canvas. (that was fine for course towels, for finer textiles you might want to get something smoother as a covering). A less spongy, more closed cell sponge might be considered for fine detail work (registration, printing in this manner, may not allow to fine an image)

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Thu, 02/24/2005 - 2:11pm
Anonymous says: Hi. Sorry it took so long to reply. I'm still reading Andy's book and a few other things and I'm getting very excited about starting my endeavor. I want to print on fabric that is about 24"x36", maybe ...

Hi. Sorry it took so long to reply. I'm still reading Andy's book and a few other things and I'm getting very excited about starting my endeavor. I want to print on fabric that is about 24"x36", maybe even slightly larger. I am making curtains and other home decor items, especially for kid's bedrooms, and may have to print on large items like bedding. I haven't started yet, I'll be setting up a SMALL studio space all this Summer, and will begin sometime in the Fall.
I guess I'll need a pretty big platen/pallette. I'm just trying to use some common sense and be as efficient as possible while still keeping a hand-made feel to my work. Thanks for all your help.

posted on: Sun, 03/13/2005 - 10:10am

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