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Need to know some history on silk sceening

Posted on Tue, 9 Nov 2004 at 13:34



I need to know some history on silk screening. Mainly I need to know where it came from. Who invented it. What popular companies use (like machines). If anyone can help me out that would be awesome!
-thank you

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Anonymous says: I believe it was "invented" a long time ago in a land far far away (China, actually). You should be able to find something at most any library on it's history (seeing how anything they do have is years ...

I believe it was "invented" a long time ago in a land far far away (China, actually).

You should be able to find something at most any library on it's history (seeing how anything they do have is years old, you might just find something written by the guy who invented it...........not impossible seeing how I beleive they invented paper about the same time)

Check out this website for possible information and for links to the few companies listed as screen printing training sites

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Tue, 11/09/2004 - 5:35pm
Anonymous says: It was patented in 1907 for hand painted stencils then in1914 it was expanded for multicolor printing with a screen process. posted on: Mon, 11/29/2004 - 9:54am
Anonymous says: From a post on an other board... Where did screen printing start. China or Japan. There is some debate on this issue... Stenciling as a way of producing a repeatable image is as old as the primitive ...

From a post on an other board...

Where did screen printing start.

China or Japan.

There is some debate on this issue...

Stenciling as a way of producing a repeatable image is as old as the primitive airbrushing of hand prints on cave walls found in Europe and the Mid east (like Iraq, Iran, Eqypt and others).

Stenciling in conjuction with printing (esp. screen printing) seems to be an Asian idea, but even they argue over who was first. I fall on the Japanese side with the historical records pointing to artistic use with hand cut artistic stencils glued to human hair mesh.

The Chinese have a strong argument for the first
'non artistic" use with clear historic records from the Sung Dynasty (A.D. 960-1280) using screen printing for publishing and banking.

Chinese use of screen printing for the printing of paper money - paper money from China was a concept ridiculed by the Europeans when it first was introduced when explorers (Polo and others) from Europe brought the printed bank notes back from Asia.

I think that I fall on the Japanese side of the arguement due to the artist Japanese traditional dyeing methods called "Yuzen" and the application of rice paper stencils in conjuction with this method. Why - well from my view the Japanese hold a higher desire for decorated clothing and I feel that human desires, greed and vanity drive artistic creation because artist tend to want to find ways to support themselves and their art with their own creations and because of that I think that the Japanese artistic use was first. - It's just a pet theory.

From the educational comic from Vastex (download free www.vastex.com)

The evolution of screen printing began thousands of years
ago when printers around the world began using cut
stencils made from natural materials and paper for
printing.

The Japanese and the Chinese developed wooden
frames to support the stencil which was glued onto a
woven fabric mesh.

This mesh, originally made from human hair, eventually was woven from silk, hence the name "silk screen printing".

The resulting mass production of ink decoration
on paper, clothing, books, and many other surfaces became an important part of Asian culture.

In the late 1800s, artists and printers in France and
Germany advanced the process, and it was given an
English patent in 1907.

In the late 1930s, artists coined the term "serigraphy" (derived from the Latin word seri [silk] and the Greek word graphein [to write]) to describe this medium distinguishing it from commercial screen printing. Today, screen printing uses manmade threads of steel, nylon, and polyester - no silk at all.

posted on: Tue, 01/11/2005 - 1:57am

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