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Printing on Glass

Posted on Mon, 11 Oct 2004 at 20:17



Hi all,

I'm wanting to print some reproduction instrument panels. The originals measure approx. 3"x12" and were done on 1/8" flat glass. It looks like the originals were silkscreened. (done on back side of glass and the pattern is mirrored)

I have since had a silkscreen made - but I'm having trouble gettting the lettering to look tidy. I keep ending up with fuzzy letter edges, and semi transparent lettering. Not exactly what I have in mind! This could very well be operator error/inexperience (me :-)), but I'm wondering if there is a better way of doing this. Maybe this wasn't how the originals were done (silk screening)?? The screen I have was professionally done on an aluminum frame and is very high quality fine screen and resolution.

Questions I have are:

1.What is the correct process for this project? What type of ink or paint should I use?
2.What would be the best way to do this today? The original glass panels were done in the 50's (very high quality workmanship)
3.Are there outfits out there that can do limited numbers of these parts for me?

Thanks,
Will

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: Screen mesh needs to be 225-250 to get enough ink through. A capillex style stencil (film) or photopolymer (direct) would give you the sharpest image with a bit of stencil depth to give you a good solid ...

Screen mesh needs to be 225-250 to get enough ink through.
A capillex style stencil (film) or photopolymer (direct) would give you the sharpest image with a bit of stencil depth to give you a good solid ink lay.
Squeegee sharp
Slight lift (1/16th)
sharp thin flood, then print
the glass and screen must be fixed during the print - no movement.

enamel ink was probably what they used. thin with turpentine or supplied ink thinner. should be the consistancy of syrup.

make sure you wipe the glass with glass cleaner or similar, and let dry before print. If it screws up, wipe clean and try again.

On multicolour glass prints using enamel, if it is dry you can clean with laquer thinner, if yit is wet you clean with turpentine and it won't remove the dried colour - very convenient to fix spoils during production.

Use the function on this site to find a printer in your area if you don't think you can handle this.

Good luck

Andy MacDougall
www.squeegeeville.com

posted on: Wed, 10/13/2004 - 1:16pm
Anonymous says: call me i can help. gary 530-249-4272 posted on: Wed, 12/15/2004 - 9:17am
Anonymous says: Hi Andy, Thanks for the reply. My apologies in responding so late. I've had a confluence of events that had to take priority over this project. Can you recommend someone in the Tampa, Florida area that ...

Hi Andy,

Thanks for the reply. My apologies in responding so late. I've had a confluence of events that had to take priority over this project. Can you recommend someone in the Tampa, Florida area that could help me with this?

Thanks,
Will

posted on: Tue, 12/28/2004 - 1:46pm
Anonymous says: Hi Gary, I called but there is something amiss with the phone number you provided. I can be contacted via email at inoue@tampabay.rr.com. Thanks, Will posted on: Tue, 12/28/2004 - 2:07pm

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