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who took the screen printing out of SGIA?

Posted on Wed, 13 Oct 2004 at 14:05



I know we are joined at the hip with our digital brothers and sisters, but I was saddened by the lack of graphic screen equipment at this year's show. If we look at the steady decline year to year, does this mean next year there will be 85% digital...I heard it was 73% digital equipment/related in the booths this year. Why would screenprinters attend the show if it continues at this rate?

The screen printing process and industry is not dead.

Comments boys and girls?

Andy MacDougall
www.squeegeeville.com

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Comments

Anonymous says: Hi Patti; I don't know the others participating in this discussion thread personally, but I do print...manually in my studio, which is just the latest incarnation of my screenprinting shop, that has gone ...

Hi Patti;

I don't know the others participating in this discussion thread personally, but I do print...manually in my studio, which is just the latest incarnation of my screenprinting shop, that has gone from a spare bedroom 25 years ago, to 3 plants 10,000 -12,000 sq ft in the 80's and 90's in a large city, with automatics, then back to a studio in my backyard here in lala land (Vancouver Island, BC, another place where unemployment is high and wages are low) where I print and experiment, do a little writing about our favotite process, and teach others to screenprint.

Rich is with M&R, (actually, I think he owns it) who probably made the printer you use or the automatic you wish to buy.

Rocky is with a company that is on the leading edge of graphic production, with a wide variety of different machine types doing a lot of different jobs, from his postings on this board he sounds like someone who has done it all over a long period of time.

Ken I don't know, but he also posts here and helps people like yourself learn the process.

You seek knowledge about this process, to make yourself a better printer. That's good, but get used to doing it through self discovery, because my point is the SGIA show, which has been a yearly place where North American printers used to converge to see new screenprinting equipment and learn and connect, is now going DIGITAL, or at least that is the focus of 75% of the booths. And with this shift, we lose focus on screenprinting. Rocky is of the opinion you just ask your sales rep for training - sorry buddy, I have been printing in this location for 10 years and never had a visit from a sales rep. The majority of shops are medium and small, and we are stuck teaching ourselves in the hinterlands. Imagine a nation of selftaught electricians, plumbers, offset printers, carpenters, or any other skilled trade. They at least get basic skills taught to a certain standard on a local level, with a basic common knowledge base nationally. We have none of that, and if we lose the support and focus of our association, we will never get there.

So yeah Patti, we talk about this stuff, and it may not be important to you, but it is to us. Just be thankfull that boards like this exist, where the bulk of threads are about real-time problems people are experiencing, and filled with answers from others who take the time to share their knowledge. Screenweb is great, so is screenprinters.net, gigposters.com, and even the message boards on squeegeeville.com! But nothing compares to having someone show you exactly how....you can still get a bit of that at the annual SGIA show, but my fear is, if things keep going digital, we will lose it. And that's a shame.

Anyway, enough blah blah blah! Keep doing what you are doing, you have the right attitude, the work and opportunity is always going to be there, good luck with your quest for knowledge and skill which will help you acheive your goals.

Andy MacDougall
www.squeegeeville.com

posted on: Sun, 11/21/2004 - 2:36pm
Anonymous says: Good Evening Patti, If we didn't know how to print or have the drive to go further than just being a squeegee puller none of us would be here. Personally I've been in the industry since 1982, back when ...

Good Evening Patti,
If we didn't know how to print or have the drive to go further than just being a squeegee puller none of us would be here.
Personally I've been in the industry since 1982, back when it was the SPIA.
I've been around for sometime, done screens with paper stencil to the Luscher CTS in that time, printed with the hand table to the big in-lines in the mag. ads.
Initially this string started with concern for some of the precieved radical changes to the SGIA. For the most part were voicing concern openly while most stay silent.
Education and keeping an open mind is the biggest key to our personal growth and in turn our employers growth.
So Patti hats off to you, your one statment " Being the best manual printer" puts you ahead of alot of people in the industry. You have made the commitment to be a printer rather than a squeegee puller.
Keep up the good work.
Ken Ferguson

posted on: Sun, 11/21/2004 - 9:30pm
Anonymous says: Good Evening Andy, Sorry for the delay in responding to your posting. Education is key. The thing about education is it needs to be taken, here's the real rub. To get it through some of our dense minds ...

Good Evening Andy,
Sorry for the delay in responding to your posting.
Education is key. The thing about education is it needs to be taken, here's the real rub. To get it through some of our dense minds we need to be UNTRAINED and then educated. As soon as you try to get someone to try something new, it always has a rough time being implemented and as soon as it gets rough some of our brainiacs in the plant go right back to what they did before. The only reason it gets rough is a simple question" do you understand what you are being taught", " do you understand what it is you are currently doing" and " do you understand why"
Where are the skilled workers?. I wish I could help but it's not just our industry, it's the world over. But for the most part our current employees are there,( don't roll your eyes at me) we all have some that do this for more than the pay check.
The key is taking the time to train them, that does not mean " do this and do that" explain to them why. If after a few explainations of why, they should be asking for more information to help them understand further, if not don't waste your time go to the next one.
We were all diamonds in the raw before we started, what made us different, we have the balls to ask questions from those who want to teach.
Yes Europe is light years ahead compared to North America in screen and printing and trades for the most part. The thing is people are educated differently there, in the pub the plumber and the CEO are treated the same.
You have McDonalds and Starbucks doing their management training which get them from cleaning tables to " do you want to mega size that".
In North America we have the MBA syndrome, no body wants to get their hands dirty and for the most part those we have in our shops don't know how to stop getting their hands dirty.
In the early stages of the industrial revolution, companies understood they were building their industry and employees understood they were building a company. Employees understood that if they learned and understood what they were doing as well demonstrated their ability to do the task when opportunity was given they would get the reward( a raise) today the trend is becoming " pay me more and I'll do the job" so the problem we see regarding trained staff is not something new, North America has pushed trades where they are today.
Everyone has to understand their current abilities, decide if they have what it takes to do the next step and ask for help to find out what their next step is.
Also employers need to understand how to manage staff, motivate staff, and educate, get supervisors to delegate and educate as well. For too long all I've seen is managers and supervisors scared that they will no longer be special if they have a properly educated staff. Your fellow in Illinois, is reaping what he has sown, put your eggs in one basket and have a stumble, what do you get, one mess.
Education is key to our industry, the seminars at the show demonstrate the fact that we have more people who do not understand the basic fundimentals, the courses at the SGIA/SPTF on the other hand take it a bit further, the real education is keeping the basic fundimentals we have, useing what we learned at the SGIA and applying that in the field. The courses at the SGIA I highly recommend, the teachers are not spouting theories, for the most part documented observations in the work place that we often over look.
If you want a course that opens eyes, take one that has Bron Wolff involved at the SGIA.
I'll let you go back to your sanding the "silkscreens", I don't reclaim, print and gutt large format.
Thanks,
Ken Ferguson

posted on: Sun, 11/21/2004 - 11:44pm
Anonymous says: Fair enough, Ken. I think we both agree on the educatin' part. I heard that Bron guy knows which sandpaper to use. yer pal Andy ps. The guy in Illinois ended up hiring someone off this site or SGIA.org. ...

Fair enough, Ken. I think we both agree on the educatin' part.

I heard that Bron guy knows which sandpaper to use.

yer pal

Andy

ps. The guy in Illinois ended up hiring someone off this site or SGIA.org. So that's cool, and let's hope they are able to build up a screenprint team there.
They have the jobs.
They have the equipment.
It all comes down to people and skills now.

posted on: Mon, 11/22/2004 - 4:58am
Anonymous says: Cool. Thanks for the honest reply & not blasting me out the water. I went into the shop today and reclaimed screens without sandpaper:) Then I promptly printed 13 hooded sweats....alas, the art was ...

Cool. Thanks for the honest reply & not blasting me out the water. I went into the shop today and reclaimed screens without sandpaper:) Then I promptly printed 13 hooded sweats....alas, the art was not ready for the next part so I busied myself with reclaiming more screens to help out the partner who was at his paid job. I'm currently working for free to get the product line ready for the real run. It's thin nylon bags with anywhere from two to three colors. Scary for me but I'm working under a guy who taught at RIT and who used to write articles for Screenprinting Journal of some sort. You know, California and New York influence down here with the Southern crowd who ,yes, says pay me more and...but I don't do this for money alone although would be nice soon to pay the rent. He also remembers the SPIA? I do know that digital is the next logical step even for my old brain to twist around. Unfortunately money makes or breaks as far as technology needs. I am just looking forward to running these bags and visiting the shrinkage issue up close again. Time, temp and patience. Oh, my fav comedian from Canada ,JC , said that life is full of uncomfortable moments (not the exact quote) and he still makes me laugh just to look at him. We all need a little grinch to make us look harder for the fixes. Any tips on the bags would be appreciated. I say a soft pad underneath on the platen to absorb some of the flash heat (but not sure if that's going to work either), then run the bags through the six foot dryer at lower temp and faster belt speed.
Patti O

posted on: Mon, 11/22/2004 - 5:03pm
Anonymous says: In my miss-spent youth I did a bit of nylon. We used a catalyst (additive) which increased the stick and promoted a lower drying temp. Although the start of a production run is not the time to be experimenting ...

In my miss-spent youth I did a bit of nylon. We used a catalyst (additive) which increased the stick and promoted a lower drying temp.

Although the start of a production run is not the time to be experimenting with new inks (test test test) be aware there are probably 10 different nylon inks available from different manufacturers. So if your particular ink is not performing as well as you think it could, try others.

Andy

posted on: Mon, 11/22/2004 - 8:20pm
Anonymous says: Thank you. We are using "Cat" from Int'l Coatings with their ink formulated for nylon. I believe a few good test runs & we'll be in the biz for the owner which is his goal and my job security... posted on: Mon, 11/22/2004 - 9:11pm
Anonymous says: Here at M&R we employee three people who's primary responsibility is to train printers on our product. If done in our facility there is no charge for the training. On site training at a customers ...

Here at M&R we employee three people who's primary responsibility is to train printers on our product. If done in our facility there is no charge for the training. On site training at a customers facility comes with a charge. There are classes for equipment matainance scheduled quarterly and have been since 1988. Printing training is on a need basis and if the demand increases we will implement scheduled classes for printing as well.

posted on: Wed, 12/01/2004 - 3:33pm
Anonymous says: What kind of sandpaper do I use? posted on: Wed, 12/01/2004 - 5:26pm
Anonymous says: That scratchy kind with the special additive for process colour printing? A. ps How's it going Bron? posted on: Wed, 12/01/2004 - 7:01pm

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