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Questions about printing on wood

Posted on Mon, 1 Nov 2004 at 12:46



I have a 1 time job printing 1600 pieces 2 color on wood, and I am looking for a couple answers and a couple tips.

1) The letters will be about 1/4 inch tall (.26") with extended, sharp serifs. Can I use the 156 mesh which I have in stock? I think not, but am hopeful. If it matters, the lettering will be reversed out rather than printed directly

2) I have emulsion hardner which allows waterbased inks -- Is there a brand or additive I should be aware of?

3) What off-contact distance should we start with? I have a home-built press which is not very adjustable, and home made screens stretched using a newman and 4 cee clamps. Sigh. is 1/8" close enough? We will be jigging the wood pieces up and printing multiples.

Suggestions?

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: The 156 mesh is mostly for t-shirt's. depending on the inks you'll be using and the actual type face your trying to reproduce you'll need upwards of 280 - 380 screen mesh Unless you were going to attempt ...

The 156 mesh is mostly for t-shirt's. depending on the inks you'll be using and the actual type face your trying to reproduce you'll need upwards of 280 - 380 screen mesh

Unless you were going to attempt to find a waterbased ink to print on your wood (which I don't readily know of) you can use the emulsion without a hardener

Off contact is totally dependant on your screen making abilities and press.

Call your:
ink vendor (ink for wood.....)
screen supply vendor (emulsion, mesh.....)
printer who knows how to print graphics instead of t-shirts

we really can't give more advise than that without knowing such things as the ink, emulsion, screen type, mesh count, screen tension, press type............

But once you do get through these little questions, you'll open up a whole new avenue for revenue, so stick with it you'll be glad you did......well maybe.

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Tue, 11/02/2004 - 7:29pm
Anonymous says: You need a 250 mesh or therabouts if you want full coverage. Go too high on wood and it gets hard to lay down enough ink. Use a good quality dual cure emulsion rated for Waterbase and you should get nice ...

You need a 250 mesh or therabouts if you want full coverage. Go too high on wood and it gets hard to lay down enough ink. Use a good quality dual cure emulsion rated for Waterbase and you should get nice edges and water resistance - Murikami 9800, autosol 8000, or similar. Neither of these need a hardener for WB if dried and exposed properly. (see my website under Print Info, free tutorial if you need more info)
I have used both waterbase and solvent based inks on wood. (TW 5000 WB, Dryfilm general purpose solvent based, nazdar Laquer, enamel, etc.) You need to check compatability with undercoat and overcoat if you are using filler or varnish. Otherwise it pretty well all sticks, although you will get bleeding with some inks and absorbant wood, thats why the sealer.
The wood needs to be sanded and sealed for best results. If you don't seal, the ink absorbs unevenly if you have open grains in the wood.
Of course get your screens as tight as possible, this affects your ability to do a nice print.
If you are printing a big flood, you may need more lift. Start with about 1/16 inch, increase as needed.
We have printed quite a lot of cedar, birch, and oak, in some pretty suspect jig set-ups, they all work and screen nicely. I'm surprised more people don't print on wood, it looks so cool.

regards,

Andy MacDougall
www.squeegeeville.com

posted on: Wed, 11/17/2004 - 3:53am

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