User login

Ink Mileage

Posted on Sun, 14 Mar 2004 at 16:57



We print on corrugated plastic and it seems that we are not getting good mileage before the ink starts drying in the screen. Like about 5-7 sheets before it starts thickening up. Just what should the ink viscosity/thickness of Nazdar 7900 series be when we startup.

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: You really should be talking to Nazdar about this. Any printing process that only gets 5-7 sheets printed before you have to stop and do anything has more flaws than just the ink. Give your rep a call, ...

You really should be talking to Nazdar about this. Any printing process that only gets 5-7 sheets printed before you have to stop and do anything has more flaws than just the ink. Give your rep a call, I'm sure they'd be happy to help solve your problem.

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Mon, 03/15/2004 - 3:08pm
Anonymous says: You can also try calling Midwest Sign & Screen for ink questions 800-228-3839. I find the 1200 series Nazdar works best on Coraplast, we have never had any problems running up to 1000+ passes with ...

You can also try calling Midwest Sign & Screen for ink questions 800-228-3839. I find the 1200 series Nazdar works best on Coraplast, we have never had any problems running up to 1000+ passes with this ink.

posted on: Thu, 04/15/2004 - 3:40pm
Anonymous says: Jonathan, If you are only getting 7 take offs before the ink body's up and plugs your mesh, you have serious issues. My guess is you are not adding the proper amount of retardant, which all NAZDAR poster ...

Jonathan,
If you are only getting 7 take offs before the ink body's up and plugs your mesh, you have serious issues. My guess is you are not adding the proper amount of retardant, which all NAZDAR poster inks come with. Your Ink system is probally NOT RFU(ready for use), but rather a two-part system. The problem with Screen printing is the large surface area of the ink that is exposed between cycles, and with solvent or aqueous ink systems, this is a huge issue. One solution may be to run humidifiers by your press to over saturate the air, These types of ink cure by "flashing off" additives, high humidity will slow this down considerably. Another issue may be with the substrate it's self, alot of high surface energy stocks generate static electricity, so in essence they act like an ink jet printer and pull strings of ink from the edge of the image (Feathering), again, humidifiers will help, so will handling and proper storage. Ask your suppliers if they have to pre-treat the stock, ask your ink supplier about the technical specs of your ink, and if they can't answer, call the ink company's hot line and talk to a Ink Technician (What I do for a living), Ink tech's will give you the real deal, if they don't know, they SHOULD ask for a sample of the substrate to perform tests to see if the ink and substrate are compatible. If they don't, change ink's as fast as possible, cheap isn't better if your buying back jobs!! Good luck, your issue is not uncommon, and can easily be dealt with.--Thomas Dunn

posted on: Sun, 06/27/2004 - 9:53am

Did you enjoy this article? Click here to subscribe to the magazine.