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u.v. ink suppliers

Posted on Wed, 25 Jan 2006 at 12:25



can anyone lead me in the direction of a u.v. ink manufacturer other than nazdar I mostly print on coroplast.

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: Jeff, Try Sericol or NORCOTE. James posted on: Wed, 01/25/2006 - 9:05pm
Anonymous says: Jeff: It sounds like you have had issues/problems using Nazdar UV ink's? Let me know why you may be disgruntled with them. I may be able to help you out. posted on: Thu, 01/26/2006 - 2:34am
Anonymous says: Use Coates Screen, excellent stuff very fast curing. posted on: Mon, 02/06/2006 - 3:36pm
Anonymous says: Hi Jeff, The two top ink manufacturers I recomend is http://www.polymericimaging.com/2/ and http://www.encresdubuit.net/index.html Both have very good UV inks for coroplast that are manufacturered in ...

Hi Jeff,
The two top ink manufacturers I recomend is http://www.polymericimaging.com/2/ and http://www.encresdubuit.net/index.html
Both have very good UV inks for coroplast that are manufacturered in North America. Neither have the Nazdar attatude, to the opposite they believe in education and helping the customer.
Personally my tongue wants to snap off it's roller if I say Nazdar or Sericol.
Hope this helps,
Ken Ferguson

posted on: Sun, 02/19/2006 - 4:41pm
Anonymous says: Jeff: just read your question today. There are UV inks which print on Coroplast, some may need a catalyst for water resistance, others do not, stock specific. BUT the first thing you might do is get a ...

Jeff: just read your question today. There are UV inks which print on Coroplast, some may need a catalyst for water resistance, others do not, stock specific. BUT the first thing you might do is get a Dyne level reading on your particular material.

If the (solid) surface energy is sufficiently lower than the (liquid) surface energy of the ink there is no initial attachment. Your only recourse is massive pressure and snail's paced print speeds.

Under treated poly-olefin will always have a low Dyne level and lack receptivity to ink. Over treated materials will lose their affinity for ink very quickly--you need to measure it.

If you do not get initial adhesion any permanent adhesion you seek will be compromised at best.

Good luck,

Joe

posted on: Wed, 03/08/2006 - 4:16pm
Anonymous says: Jeff: Polymeric imaging has a great product for coroplast. You can get in contact with them at 800-746-5567 or sales@polymericimaging.com ask for Mike Plier, great guy!!! he will be able to help you out. Good ...

Jeff:

Polymeric imaging has a great product for coroplast. You can get in contact with them at 800-746-5567 or sales@polymericimaging.com ask for Mike Plier, great guy!!! he will be able to help you out.

Good luck,
Mark

posted on: Wed, 03/22/2006 - 3:11am
Anonymous says: Where can I get a Dyne level reading Meter/ device? posted on: Wed, 03/22/2006 - 1:09pm
Anonymous says: FYI, Dyne level testers are a liquid. They come in easy to use pens (sort of like a felt tip marker) but become contaminated easily. The best testers come in a bottle form and you use a clean Q-tip for ...

FYI, Dyne level testers are a liquid. They come in easy to use pens (sort of like a felt tip marker) but become contaminated easily. The best testers come in a bottle form and you use a clean Q-tip for every test. You can buy a "kit" that contains a range of dyne levels, but the best method is having the lowest level that your printing ink tolerates and testing your material for a pass/fail at that level.

Check with your ink supplier for the dyne level they recommend (then lower it by a couple of levels as they will probably hedge their bets and give you the "optimum" dyne level for their ink).

It's been a while since I've used any of this so you might want to google it for a manufacturer/supplier or contact any ink manufacturer for a recomendation.

Dyne levels below 38-36 would probably need a catalyst or some form of additive and recommended levels by ink companies will probably be in the mid to high 40's.

Be advised that dyne levels/ surface treatments decay over time and any polyethylene's, coroplasts, etc that have been sitting for a while will lose their effectiveness for adhesion.

Good Luck
Rocky

posted on: Thu, 03/23/2006 - 2:45pm
Anonymous says: Hi Jeff, I see you have a problem with your current ink supplier. I represent Nor-Cote international and we manufactur and EXCELLENT, fast curing product for Coroplast. I would appreciate the opportunity ...

Hi Jeff,

I see you have a problem with your current ink supplier. I represent Nor-Cote international and we manufactur and EXCELLENT, fast curing product for Coroplast. I would appreciate the opportunity to send you a sample and earn your business

Thanks

Michael Sloan

posted on: Mon, 05/01/2006 - 12:38pm
Anonymous says: Oops, here is Nor-Cote's contact info www.norcote.com 800-488-9180 Mike posted on: Mon, 05/01/2006 - 12:43pm

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