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need advice regarding fine lines

Posted on Fri, 26 Nov 2004 at 20:32



I'm trying to imprint images composed of very fine lines (think of fairly detailed pen-sketch artwork) but can't seem to get the inks to really be permanent. I'm using the ink type recommended for the substrate involved (at the moment, coffe mugs). I've also learned here that I need to work with a shop temperature of between 65-70 degrees F. I did some trial ones that were then used and washed only about once a week. But the images came off in places when run through a dishwasher. Is this dishwasher demolition a common reaction? Is there a formula somewhere for how long things like this should bake in the oven to set the image? Or is it the fact that I'm using fine lines? I'd be wiped out if this were the problem, as I have huge ideas for this thing that involve using my own pen artwork as a basis. Many thanks.

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Anonymous says: The lines should not come off. You did not say if you are using a hardener or not. if not you should. The ink manufacture should give you the curing temps and time. Hardened inks can take up to 7 days ...

The lines should not come off. You did not say if you are using a hardener or not. if not you should. The ink manufacture should give you the curing temps and time.

Hardened inks can take up to 7 days to cure others can continue to cure for a few weeks.

You should clean the imprinted area with alcohol before printing.

Hope this helps

Frank

posted on: Mon, 11/29/2004 - 2:03pm
Anonymous says: Thanks, Frank, for taking the time to answer this. Everything sounded right except the curing times- it was only a few days between the time these were imprinted and the time they were first run through ...

Thanks, Frank, for taking the time to answer this. Everything sounded right except the curing times- it was only a few days between the time these were imprinted and the time they were first run through a dishwasher. Hopefully that's what made the problem. Curiously, the ones printed in red washed off first, and the ones printed in black didn't suffer from this at all. I've gone over my notes from the print run, and have been unable to discern a procedural difference. I even used the same plate, so it wasn't an issue of ink thickness. The only possible variant is that the humidity was higher during the run of black ink ones (it was raining outside the garage). *shrug*

posted on: Mon, 11/29/2004 - 10:45pm
Anonymous says: Humidity should not be an issue; the ink should stick well. You may need to try a different ink type or manufacture. Are you using a hardener? You may need to add more hardener to the red ink. posted on: Thu, 12/02/2004 - 12:32pm
Anonymous says: Frank has the right idea, maybe a different type of ink and if you'r parts are going into the dishwasher, you WILL have to double the amount of hardener. posted on: Mon, 12/06/2004 - 9:18am
Anonymous says: What brand of ink are you using? If Marabu then you should use the GL ink. Also keep in mind that most glass inks MUST be cured in a oven after printing. It isnt sufficent to let them harden by time only. ...

What brand of ink are you using? If Marabu then you should use the GL ink. Also keep in mind that most glass inks MUST be cured in a oven after printing. It isnt sufficent to let them harden by time only. Glass ink must be oven cured to get the dishwasher safe property.

You can test curing them in a regular household oven.

/Anders

posted on: Wed, 12/08/2004 - 2:57am

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