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Need some help

Posted on Sat, 17 Jan 2004 at 22:31



Hello all,

here is a story... I wanted to start making a screen printed coroplast yard signs. So I bought from one company some mesh material (250), and acryllic solvent based black and red inks. Then i builded a frame 18"x24 using .5"x.5" square wood, I streched mesh on it (as good as possible close to tear it apart). Then I cut using my plotter a "stencil" on a regular intermidiate sign vinyl (oracal 650) and applied it to a screen. Then I put it on a piece of coro, put some ink on it, squeeze it with a standard 4" vinyl sign squeege, took it up and my printed sign was a mess - letters were not shap with a almost 1/4" blur around. Then I tryed to put vinyl on an other side of a mesh, I used some ink thinner, etc - same result.

Can you please tell me what I'm I doing wrong? Or only one method is to buy that expencive burner unit and use it with that photo film?
Any info is greatly appriciates.

exsigns@hotmail.com

Stan

Location of Opportunity or Item

Comments

Anonymous says: If you have a vinyl cutter/plotter, why didn't you just cut out the vinyl and apply it to your coroplast sign (lots of short run coroplast yard signs are sold that way). As for the screenprinting you ...

If you have a vinyl cutter/plotter, why didn't you just cut out the vinyl and apply it to your coroplast sign (lots of short run coroplast yard signs are sold that way).

As for the screenprinting you tried, there are so many things you don't know that caused you to do it wrong, it would take a book ("How to screenprint for fun and profit". see this site's advertising section) to explain all of them to you.

I could understand why you would go to all this trouble if you were doing this for yourself and wanted to experience the fun of screenprinting, but if you were doing these signs for profit, well you should have gotten a professional to do them for you.

We screen printers that do this for a living are constantly being underestimated by other sign manufacturer's as to the complexity and expertise that's needed to be professional at the screen printing game.

Good luck in your future endeavers (check out this website for technicall training manuals for everything from screen making, inks, art prep and screen printing supplies specific to what you want to do)

Rocky

posted on: Tue, 01/20/2004 - 4:58pm
Anonymous says: Aha, It's like a rocket science. posted on: Tue, 01/20/2004 - 5:34pm
Anonymous says: Stan, It's not rocket science. However there is a learning curve even after a sizeable investment. You should start with the book mentioned and you might also visit a full time screen print shop. Most ...

Stan, It's not rocket science. However there is a learning curve even after a sizeable investment. You should start with the book mentioned and you might also visit a full time screen print shop. Most shop owners will happily show you their operation because to see a big shop running for your first time is quite impressive. You will probably find that if you do what you do best and get a fair price for your talents and labor and sub-contract all the other work and ad in a fair proffit that you will make a lot more money and your product will always be of top notch quality.

posted on: Wed, 01/21/2004 - 6:46pm
Anonymous says: need to know if your going to send me payment for the fonts i sold you! posted on: Sat, 02/12/2005 - 9:50am

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